Who teaches us to be normal when we’re a one of a kind?


You, and every one of us is one of a kind.
Best estimates have it that there have been about 100 billion humans, each one unique: a one-off.
Only you gets to be you.

Who teaches us to be normal when we’re a one off?
– Sydney Barrett

From the TV show: Legion: ch 5

Posted in Emancipate yourself..., human diversity, human potential, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

leave me alone – New Order


 

Leave Me Alone
New Order

On a thousand islands in the sea
I see a thousand people just like me
A hundred unions in the snow
I watch them walking, falling in a row
We live always underground
It’s going to be so quiet in here tonight
A thousand islands in the sea
It’s a shame

And a hundred years ago
A sailor trod this ground I stood upon
Take me away everyone
When it hurts thou

From my head to my toes
From the words in the book
I see a vision that would bring me luck
From my head to my toes
To my teeth, through my nose
You get these words wrong
You get these words wrong
Everytime
You get these words wrong
I just smile

But from my head to my toes
From my knees to my eyes
Everytime I watch the sky
For these last few days leave me alone
But for these last few days leave me alone
Leave me alone
Leave me alone

 

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Questionable – MunizO


 

 

MunizO

WWW. MunizO.com
Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/munizo023/

In The News  https://www.thestar.com/entertainment/2016/06/16/munizo-ditches-label-deal-in-japan-to-busk-in-toronto.html

 

 

 

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The Crunch – Charles Bukowski


who put this brain inside of me?

it cries
it demands
it says that there is a chance.

it will not say
“no.”

 

The Crunch
Charles Bukowski

too much too little

too fat
too thin
or nobody.

laughter or
tears

haters
lovers

strangers with faces like
the backs of
thumb tacks

armies running through
streets of blood
waving winebottles
bayoneting and fucking
virgins.

an old guy in a cheap room
with a photograph of M. Monroe.

there is a loneliness in this world so great
that you can see it in the slow movement of
the hands of a clock

people so tired
mutilated
either by love or no love.

people just are not good to each other
one on one.

the rich are not good to the rich
the poor are not good to the poor.

we are afraid.

our educational system tells us
that we can all be
big-ass winners

it hasn’t told us
about the gutters
or the suicides.

or the terror of one person
aching in one place
alone

untouched
unspoken to

watering a plant.

people are not good to each other.
people are not good to each other.
people are not good to each other.

I suppose they never will be.
I don’t ask them to be.

but sometimes I think about
it.

the beads will swing
the clouds will cloud
and the killer will behead the child
like taking a bite out of an ice cream cone.

too much
too little

too fat
too thin
or nobody

more haters than lovers.

people are not good to each other.
perhaps if they were
our deaths would not be so sad.

meanwhile I look at young girls
stems
flowers of chance.

there must be a way.

surely there must be a way that we have not yet
thought of.

who put this brain inside of me?

it cries
it demands
it says that there is a chance.

it will not say
“no.”

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BDSM v DSM – weaponising and then de-kinking diagnosis


Nice article in The Atlantic by Merrisa Nathan Gerson from 2015 telling story of how, with the DSM diagnosis became weaponized and used against people with a range of preferences deemed [by those who get their kicks deeming others to be too different] – as “sexually deviant” and thusly “mentally ill”;  and the story of how the “big book of dehumanizing names” came to be de-kinked – or kinked,  depending on how you like yours.

Maybe, if you find DSM is dominating your life then gi’ it some B.

BDSM Versus the DSM

A history of the fight that got kink de-classified as mental illness

Maegan Tintati/Flickr/The Atlantic

MERISSA NATHAN GERSON

JAN 13, 2015

Asking your partner to tie you to the bedpost, telling them to slap you hard in the throes of lovemaking, dressing like a woman if you are a man, admitting a fetish for feet: Just a few years ago, any of these acts could be used against you in family court.This was the case until 2010, when the American Psychiatric Association announced that it would be changing the diagnostic codes for BDSM, fetishism, and transvestic fetishism (a variant of cross-dressing) in the next edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), published in 2013. The new definitions marked a distinction between behavior—for example, playing rough—and actual pathology. Consenting adults were no longer deemed mentally ill for choosing sexual behavior outside the mainstream.

The change was the result of a massive effort from the National Coalition for Sexual Freedom (NCSF), an advocacy group founded in 1997 “to advance the rights of and advocate for consenting adults in the BDSM-Leather-Fetish, Swing, and Polyamory Communities.” At the time, these types of sexual behavior, by virtue of their inclusion in the DSM, were considered markers of mental illness—and, as a result, were heavily stigmatized, often with legal repercussions. In family court, an interest in BDSM was used as justification to remove people’s children from their custody.

Fifty Shades of Grey hadn’t come along yet. Kink was still this dark, secret thing people did.”

“A sexual sadist practices on non-consenting people,” explains NCSF founder Susan Wright, while “someone who is kinky is having consensual enthusiastically desired sex.” The problem with the earlier DSM: It didn’t draw a distinction between the two. A 1998 survey from the NCSF found that “36 percent of S&M practitioners have been victims of harassment, and 30 percent have been victims of discrimination.” As a result, the organization’s website says, “24 percent [have lost] a job or a contract, 17 percent [have lost] a promotion, and 3 percent [have lost] custody of a child.”

“We were seeing the DSM used as a weapon,” says Race Bannon, an NCSF Board Member and the creator of Kink-Aware Professionals, a roster of safe and non-judgmental healthcare professionals for the BDSM and kink community. (The list is now maintained by the NCSF.) “Fifty Shades [of Grey] had not come along,” says Bannon, an early activist in the campaign to change the DSM. “[Kink] was still this dark and secret thing people did.”

Since its first edition was published in 1952, the DSM has often posed a problem for anyone whose sexual preferences fell outside the mainstream. Homosexuality, for example, was considered a mental illness—a “sociopathic personality disturbance”—until the APA changed the language in 1973. More broadly, the DSM section on paraphilias (a blanket term for any kind of unusual sexual interest), then termed “sexual deviations,” attempted to codify all sexual preferences considered harmful to the self or others—a line that, as one can imagine, is tricky in the BDSM community.The effort to de-classify kink as a psychiatric disorder began in 1980s Los Angeles with Bannon and his then-partner, Guy Baldwin, a therapist who worked mostly with the gay and alternative sexualities communities. Bannon, a self-described “community organizer, activist, writer, and advocate” moved to Los Angeles in 1980 and soon became close with Baldwin through their mutual involvement as open participants in and advocates for the kink community. “I’m fairly confident that I was the first licensed mental-health practitioner anywhere who was out about being a practicing sadomasochist,” Baldwin says.

“We were seeing the DSM used as a weapon.”

DSM used as a weapon

The pair was spurred to action after the 1987 edition of the DSM-III-R, which introduced the concept of paraphilias, changed the classifications for BDSM and kink from “sexual deviation” to actual disorders defined by two diagnostic criteria. To be considered a mental illness, the first qualification was: ‘‘Over a period of at least six months, recurrent, intense sexual urges and sexually arousing fantasies involving the act (real, not simulated) of being humiliated, beaten, bound, or otherwise made to suffer.’’ The second: ‘‘The person has acted on these urges, or is markedly distressed by them.’’

“1987 was a bad shift,” Wright recalls. “Anyone who was [voluntarily] humiliated, beaten, bound, or any other alternate sexual expression was considered mentally ill.”With the new language, Baldwin says, he quickly realized that laws regarding alternative sexual behavior would continue to be problematic “as long as the psychiatric community defines these behaviors as pathological.”

“I knew there were therapists around the world diagnosing practicing consensual sadomasochists with mental illness,” he says.

At the time that the new DSM was published, Baldwin and Bannon were planning to attend the 1987 march on Washington, D.C., in support of gay rights; after the new criteria came out, they decided to host a panel discussion for mental-health professionals in the State Department auditorium, where they announced the launch of what would come to be known as “The DSM Revision Project.”

“We asked how many people in the room were mental-health professionals,” Baldwin says, and “two-thirds of the people in the room raised their hands. And we said, ‘The way this needs to happen is, licensed mental-health practitioners need to write the DSM committee that reviews the language of the DSM concerned with paraphilias.’”

Around 40 or 50 people left the session with the information needed to write the letters. “We did not know exactly what would result,” Bannon recalls. “We did not think we would see dramatic changes suddenly.”

They didn’t—but the changes they did see were positive. The next edition of the DSM, published in 1994, added that to be considered part of a mental illness, “fantasies, sexual urges, or behaviors” must “cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.”“This was a definite improvement from the DSM-III-R,” says Wright, who later took over leadership of the DSM Revision Project from Bannon and Baldwin.

“These criteria gave [health professionals] wiggle room to say, ‘They have issues, but it is not about their kink. For the vast majority, it is just the way they have sex,’” Bannon explains. “Rather than saying, ‘Because you are into this method of sexuality, you are sick,’ [they could say], ‘Pathologically, if this impacts your life negatively, then you have a problem.’”

But the new language in the 1994 DSM also allowed for wiggle room of a different kind: The threshold of “significant distress” was often loosely interpreted, with the social stigma of kink, rather than kink itself, causing the negative impact on people’s lives. Workplace discrimination and violence were on the rise, according to a 2008 NCSF survey, and people were still being declared unfit parents as a result of their sexual preferences: Eighty of the 100 people who turned to the NCSF for legal assistance in custody battles from 1997-2010 lost their cases.

A few years after the 1994 DSM was published, Wright decided it was time to fight for another revision. When she founded the organization in 1997, the NCSF’s goal was a change to the APA’s diagnostic codes that separated the behavior (e.g., “he likes to restrict his breathing during sex”) from the diagnosis (e.g., “his desire to restrict his breath means that he must be mentally ill”). The next DSM, the group argued, should split the paraphilias from the paraphilic disorders, so that simply enjoying consensual BDSM would not be considered indicative of an illness.Their efforts were largely ignored by the APA until early 2009, when Wright attended a panel discussion at New York City’s Philosophy Center on why people practice BDSM. Among the panelists was psychiatrist Richard Krueger, whose expertise included the diagnosis and treatment of paraphilias and sexual disorders.

During the meeting, Wright says, “I brought up the point that the DSM manual caused harm to BDSM people because it perpetuated the stigma that we were mentally ill. [Krueger] heard me and said that was not what they intended with the DSM.” Krueger, it turned out, was on the APA’s paraphilias committee, and following the meeting opened up an email dialogue between Wright and the other committee members, in which Wright provided documentation about the violence and discrimination kinky people experienced. “I credited that to the DSM,” she says. “Courts used it. Therapists used it. And it was being misinterpreted.”

Over the next year, “I sent him information, he gave it to the group, they asked questions, and I responded. It was very productive,” Wright recalls. “We [the NCSF] felt we were heard, we were listened to—and they took [our arguments] into account when they changed the wording” of the DSM in 2010.

“Courts used it. Therapists used it. And it was being misinterpreted.”

Another major factor in the NCSF’s favor was a paper, co-written by sexual-medicine physician Charles Moser and sexologist Peggy J. Kleinplatz and published in 2006 in the Journal of Psychology and Human Sexuality, titled “DSM IV-TR and the Paraphilias: An Argument for Removal.” According to Wright, the paper, which “summed up opinions of mental-health professionals who thought you shouldn’t include sexual activity in the DSM,” played a significant role in the paraphilia committee’s eventual shift in language.

In February 2010 the proposed change was made public—clarifying, Wright says, that “the mental illness [depends on] how it is expressed, not the behavior itself.” The new guidelines drew a clear difference, in other words, between people expressing a healthy range of human sexuality (for example, a couple that likes to experiment, consensually, with whips, chains, and dungeons) and sadists who wish others genuine harm (for example, tying and whipping someone in a basement without their consent).

The DSM-5 was released in May 2013, its contents marking a victory for the NCSF, Bannon, and Baldwin. The final language states: “A paraphilia is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for having a paraphilic disorder, and a paraphilia by itself does not necessarily justify or require clinical intervention.”

“Now we are seeing a sharp drop in people having their children removed from their custody,” Wright explains. Since the change, according to the NCSF, less than 10 percent of people who sought the organization’s help in custody cases have had their children removed, and the number of discrimination cases has dropped from more than 600 in 2002 to 500 in 2010 to around 200 over the last year.

“The APA basically came out and said, ‘These people are mentally healthy,’” Wright says. “‘It’s had a direct impact on society.”

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The Need for Authenticity – Gabor Mate


Gabor Mate on the need for authenticity……

Expanding on some ideas from his book “When The Body Says No”
Ideas like..

  • anger which is about protecting what is valuable, yet is regarded as “negative emotion” and suppressed, and that energy goes inside to what we often call “depression”
  • how what we value kills us – women especially taking care of the needs of others and neglecting their own, or working all hours to pay for stuff
  • how, if we dont say “no” then eventually our body will.

And thanks to AG for this one.

Lots more Gabor Mate on http://www.recoverynet.ca and elsewhere

 

 

 

 

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Why? Supaman


And why don’t we turn from all the hate?
And why don’t we learn from all mistakes?
Why do I keep on wrecking these fat beats?

Why?  – Supaman

Hanawena ha wen hey

Hanawena ha wen hey yo wa

[Verse 1]
Why is one man rich and another man poor
Why we ain’t satisfied, why we gotta have more?
Why is suicide rates on the rez so high?
Why I tell you the truth, but you say “Don’t lie.”
Why is being a good father at an all time low?
Why is it acceptable? Yo, why? I don’t know
Why she blame him and he blame her? It’s useless
Ask yourself this question, “Why you making excuses?”
Why do parents gotta bury their kids
While we text and drive, not caring how scary it is?
Why it’s so hard to forgive and leave the past behind?
And if you did, then that’s divine
Why don’t you help your brother when you see him fall?
Why do we act like God don’t see it all?
Why do we call them Black, them White, them Asians and use labels?
Now that’s racism

[Hook – 4x]
Hanawena ha wen hey (Why)
Hanawena ha wen hey yo wa (Why)

[Verse 2]
Why is there innocent people locked up for life?
Why some people can’t say nothing nice?
Why do we always gotta question what all of it means
And why won’t you follow your dreams?
Tell me why…the night when you took my dad
Why’d you let me see my grandpa cry?
And tell me why
And why do you choose to hide
Even though you was born to fly?
And tell me why
And why don’t we turn from all the hate?
And why don’t we learn from all mistakes?
Why do I keep on wrecking these fat beats?
And teachers don’t make more than professional athletes

And why? Hée why? Hée why?
Hée why? Hée why? Hée why?

[Hook – 4x]
Hanawena ha wen hey (Why)
Hanawena ha wen hey yo wa (Why)

Supaman
Facebook:
  https://www.facebook.com/Supamanhiphop/
Twitter:       https://twitter.com/Supamanhiphop?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

 

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Two-Eyed Seeing – Rebecca Thomas


Rebecca Thomas on Etuaptmunk: Two-Eyed Seeing.

Poetry can give a voice to the voiceless. Poetry can make a powerless person feel powerful. This is why I speak.

Rebecca Thomas.

 

 

 

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Human – Rag n Bone Man


 

I’m only human
I’m only, I’m only
I’m only human, human

 

 

I’m only human
I’m only, I’m only
I’m only human, human

Maybe I’m foolish
Maybe I’m blind
Thinking I can see through this
And see what’s behind
Got no way to prove it
So maybe I’m blind
But I’m only human after all
I’m only human after all
Don’t put your blame on me
Don’t put your blame on me

Take a look in the mirror
And what do you see
Do you see it clearer
Or are you deceived
In what you believe
‘Cause I’m only human after all
You’re only human after all
Don’t put the blame on me
Don’t put your blame on me

Some people got the real problems
Some people out of luck
Some people think I can solve them
Lord heavens above
I’m only human after all
I’m only human after all
Don’t put the blame on me
Don’t put the blame on me

Don’t ask my opinion
Don’t ask me to lie
Then beg for forgiveness
For making you cry
Making you cry
‘Cause I’m only human after all
I’m only human after all
Don’t put your blame on me
Don’t put the blame on me

Oh, some people got the real problems
Some people out of luck
Some people think I can solve them
Lord heavens above
I’m only human after all
I’m only human after all
Don’t put the blame on me
Don’t put the blame on me

I’m only human
I make mistakes
I’m only human
That’s all it takes
To put the blame on me
Don’t put the blame on me

I’m no prophet or Messiah
Should go looking somewhere higher
I’m only human after all
I’m only human after all
Don’t put the blame on me
Don’t put the blame on me

I’m only human
I do what I can
I’m just a man
I do what I can
Don’t put the blame on me
Don’t put your blame on me

Written by Rory Charles Graham, Jamie Hartman • Copyright © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc
Posted in Uncategorized

Still Trying – Nathaniel Rateliff


I don’t know
I don’t know
I don’t know
I don’t know a goddamn thing

When I wake up in the morning, I’m gonna tell
I was standing looking backwards in the outs
You said there’s room enough to cramping in the crowd
No movement here no friends to break us out
Stop breathing or we’ll just swim fast

I don’t know
I don’t know
I don’t know
I don’t know a goddamn thing

In these moments I forget to tell myself
And if you’re rolling in it long enough, your shit won’t even smell
Is there no one I can trust to point it out
Well I can hardly be right here, I was spitting on myself
When I wake up in the morning I’m gonna tell

I don’t know
I don’t know
I don’t know
I don’t know a goddamn thing

This wound is gonna cancel me out (x4)

Ooh ooh I don’t know
I don’t know
I don’t know
I don’t know a goddamn thing

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